Art is a means of communication beyond the verbal which can transmit an emotion and allows to escape. It can be transcribed on many things such as the architecture of a building, the kitchen or even on canvas.

 

 

In Brussels, art has been discreetly transposed on the walls in unexpected places. All these frescoes have one thing in common: the world of comic strips from Éditions Hergé among others! The theme was not chosen randomly this Belgian author created one of the most famous comic strips: The adventures of Tintin. His name wasn’t really Hergé but Georges Remi. This author’s name originates from the initials “R” in his surname and “G” in his first name.

 

Monsieur Jean. Rue des Bogards

Monsieur Jean. Rue des Bogards

 

In 1920, it was only a matter of masking or embellishing one or the other gable or wall pan of the city which claimed to be one of the capitals of the comic strip and above all to show that many cartoonists grew up in Brussels. Then, over time, the theme remained the same but expanded with other publishers, such as Lucky Luke, a French-Belgian comic strip by western. Today, there are about fifty of them spread throughout the city.

 

Boule et Bill. Rue du Chevreuil.

Boule et Bill. Rue du Chevreuil.

 

Marsupilami. Avenue de Houba de Strooper

Marsupilami. Avenue de Houba de Strooper

 

This “exhibition” in open air and free of charge, without information, arouses curiosity. Where did these drawings come from? What is their history? Who are the authors? Not all artists are Belgian of course. Some are Swiss like the Marsupilami comic strip. But she was born in Belgium with “Le journal de Spirou” in the Spirou and Fantasio collection, before having her own series. Lucky Luke mentioned above was also born thanks to special issues of the Spirou diary.

 

Gaston Lagaffe. Rue de l'Ecuyer Le passage. Rue du Marché au Charbon Kinky et Cosy. Rue des Bogards Tintin. Rue de l'ETUVE Brousaille. Rue du Marché au Charbon Olivier Rameau. Rue du Chêne

Gaston Lagaffe. Rue de l’Ecuyer
Le passage. Rue du Marché au Charbon
Kinky et Cosy. Rue des Bogards
Tintin. Rue de l’ETUVE
Brousaille. Rue du Marché au Charbon
Olivier Rameau. Rue du Chêne

 

A large number of French-speaking comics are of Belgian origin, hence the French-Belgian expression comic strip. From Tintin to Lucky Luke to Spirou, and even Kinky and Cosy: a comic strip for adults, the greatest historical heroes of the Belgian comic strip are not lacking! But why, a thousand ports, were they all born there? Walk through the streets of Brussels and Marcinelle in an attempt to understand

 

Date de dernière mise à jour: 5 March 2018